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03/04/2019
Marshall's March Update

Monthly update (or, what Marshall did in January and February) There are four main areas where I spend my time. Libc++, where I am the “code owner” WG21, where I am the chair of the Library Working Group (LWG) Boost Speaking at conferences Libc++ The LLVM “branch for release” occurred in January, and there was a bit of a rush to get things into the LLVM 8 release. Now that is over, and we’re just watching the test results, seeing if anyone finds any problems with the release. I don’t anticipate any, but you never know. As the “code owner” for libc++, I also have to review the contributions of other people to libc++, and evaluate and fix bugs that are reported. That’s a never-ending task; there are new contributions ever day. After the branch, I started working on new features for the LLVM 9 release (for this summer). More calendaring stuff, new C++20 features, and some C++17 features that haven’t been done yet. LWG papers implemented in Jan/Feb P0355: Extending to Calendars and Time Zones. You may remember this from last month's update; this is a huge paper, and I am landing it in stages. P1024: tuple-like interface to...

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03/01/2019
Adler & Colvin engaged

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01/14/2019
Marshall's January Update

Monthly update (or, what Marshall did in December) There are three main areas where I spend my time. Boost Libc++ WG21, where I am the chair of the Library Working Group (LWG) Boost: December was a big month for boost, and much of the first part of the month was taken up with the release process. I was the release manager for the 1.69.0 release, which went live on 12-December. The final release process was fairly straighforward, with only one release candidate being made/tested - as opposed to the beta, which took three. In any case, we had a successful release, and the I (and other boost developers) are now happily working on features/bug fixes for the 1.70 release - which will occur in March. Libc++: After the WG21 meeting in November, there was a bunch of new functionality to be added to libc++. The list of new features (and their status) can be seen on the libc++ website. My major contributions of new features in December were Consistent Container Erasure, char8_t: A type for UTF-8 characters and strings, and Should Span be Regular?, and a big chunk of [Extending to Calendars and Time Zones](https://wg21.link/P0355R7). This is all pointing towards...

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11/13/2018
Wg21 San Diego Trip Report

WG21 San Diego Meeting Last week was the fall 2018 WG21 standard committee meeting. It was held in San Diego, which is my hometown. The fact that I helped organize it (while I was working at Qualcomm) had absolutely no affect on the location, I assure you. ;-) This was the largest WG21 meeting ever, with 180 attendees. The last meeting (in Rapperswil, Switzerland) had about 150 attendees, and that was the largest one until now. There were more than 270 papers in the pre-meeting mailing; meaning that people were spending weeks reading papers to prepare for the meeting. Herb Sutter (the convener) has been telling everyone that new papers received after the San Diego meeting were out of scope for C++20, and apparently people took him at his word. This was my first meeting representing the C++ Alliance (though hardly my first overall). The Alliance was well represented, with Rene, Glen, Vinnie, Jon and myself attending. For information about how WG21 is structured, please see isocpp.org. I spent all of my time in LWG, since that’s the group that I chair, and the one that has the most influence over libc++, the library that I work on. The big...

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10/24/2018
Initial Work On Certify Complete

Initial work on Certify complete It’s been mentioned in my initial blog post that I’d be working on a TLS certificate store abstraction library, with the intent of submitting it for formal review for Boost, at some point in the (hopefully near) future. The initial setup phase (things that every Software Engineer hates) is more or less complete. CI setup was a bit tricky - getting OpenSSL to run with the boost build system on both Windows and Linux (and in the future MacOS) has provided a lot of “fun” thanks to the inherent weirdness of OpenSSL. The test harness currently consists of two test runners that loads certificates from a database (big name for a folder structure stored in git) that has the certificate chains divided into two groups. Chains that will fail due to various reasons (e.g. self-signed certificates, wrong domain name) and ones that will pass (when using a valid certificate store). I’m still working on checking whether the failure was for the expected reason. All the verification is done offline (i.e. no communication with external servers is performed, only chain verification). At this point it looks like I should consider, whether the current design of the...

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